If DCs are looking for chiropractic jobs or hiring a chiropractor to work in their office, one of the first questions that is usually asked is whether the doctor should be an employee or an independent contractor? Whether you`re a clinic owner or manager or a chiropractor who works as a contractor, you need to carefully consider these trial questions. Although the popularity of contractor relationships has risen sharply in recent decades, many such relationships are inappropriately characterized by the parties themselves. Unpleasant scenarios can result from the fact that the relationship is not clearly determined by both parties. For example, an employer`s tax debt is determined by the worker`s employment status. When a worker is a worker, employers must pay national and federal unemployment tax, social security tax, and disability award/disability award to a public insurance fund. Where a worker is a self-employed contractor, the worker is not required to make any of these payments. This error can also be described as an “independent contractor that is not”. That`s how it happens. The recruitment document wants to bring the new DC while saving some taxes by making it an independent contractor and not an employee. The owner feels justified because his goal is for the employee to build his own practice independently of his own. Thus, together, the two practices increase the revenues of the clinic as a whole. It is also important to hire a doctor as a worker or an independent contractor, whether he or she has treatment error insurance in an amount comparable to you.

Several factors are involved in this investigation. As described in Table 1, employees generally receive a fixed hourly rate or salary, are covered by benefits, work a certain number of hours per week, and report to a supervisor who supervises and controls his or her activities. Typically, employees also have a professional designation and a clinic business card, use clinic devices, and have the clinic pay for business fees. However, where the person makes decisions as to how services are provided and billed, are paid on a revenue-sharing or other variable basis, are not covered by benefits, decides when he or she works, works for other clinics or provides independent services to non-clinical clients, works autonomously (unattended), covers his own business expenses, has his own business cards, uses his own equipment and pays rent for the space to practice, the person is rather considered a contractor. There are different pros and cons if you work either as an employee, as a subcontractor in your clinic, or if you have one. A contractor may be dismissed in the very short term (e.g. B 15 to 30 days), while workers are entitled to much more generous redundancy payments (up to 24 months` notice or remuneration). The employees have made their pay slips and clinic deductions for them, but the contractors take care of theirs. In some cases, contractors may unsubscribe from CPP and deduct business-related expenses in the tax period that an employee cannot do. Employment relations and working conditions are subject to a complex network of legislation, while relations between contractors are much less regulated, except through private contracts between the parties. We all know the Ententest — if it looks like a duck, swims like a duck and is like a duck, it`s probably a duck.

This test is of great help in determining whether the relationship between a clinic and a chiropractor or other professional/service provider is an employment relationship or if the relationship is independent. Chiropractors in the HNS network may choose to introduce an independent contractor into their practice. It is important to remember that if an independent contractor practices in the same physical location as other chiropractors, the independent contractor must participate with HNS, or none of the chiropractors who practice that physical location can participate with HNS. . . .